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INTRODUCTION

GENERAL BACKGROUND

 History

 Definitions

ANALYSIS

 Reasons

 Strategies

 Categories

 Pros/Cons

 Best Practices

 Implementation

 Future

SYSTEMIC IMPACT

IMPLICATIONS

CONCLUSIONS

RECOMMENDATIONS

REFERENCES

APPENDICES

AUTHOR NOTES

TABLES

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Trends and Issues: The Impact of Learning Objects

History of Learning Objects (LOs)

Wiley wrote in his book, “The Instructional Use of Learning Objects” that Merrill and his colleagues did the first serious theoretical work on the idea of using pieces of individual digital resources as the basis for instructional design when they developed the Component Display Theory (CDT) at Brigham Young University in the early 1970s. The CDT evolved into Instructional Transaction Theory, which utilized “knowledge objects” as the components of instruction. In 1994, Wayne Hodgins named a CEdMa workgroup LALO, Learning Architecture, and Learning Objects, which popularized the term “learning objects” (2002).

Wiley also wrote in his book, “The Instructional Use of Learning Objects” that to facilitate the widespread adoption of the Learning Objects approach, the Learning Technology Standards Committee (LTSC) of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) was formed in 1996 to develop and promote instructional technology standards (LTSC, 2000a). At the same time, another venture called the Instructional Management Systems (IMS) Project was just beginning in the United States, with funding from Educom (IMS, 2000a). Each of these and other organizations began developing technical standards to support the broad deployment of Learning Objects (2002).

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